PDU

Basic rack PDU

A basic rPDU is as simple as it sounds: a reliable power strip that distributes power to your critical IT infrastructure. They are cost effective entry-level solutions meeting a broad range of requirements to keep your equipment up and running.

Manufacturers provide a variety of features on basic power distribution units to ensure high availability and future proof functionality. For example, you can purchase a basic PDU with locking receptacles to minimize the risk of accidentally unplugging equipment. Additionally, some manufactures offer upgradeable models designed to add intelligence, if business needs change.

Generally speaking though, the basic rPDU does not provide any insight into equipment power usage and can not be accessed over the network.

This option is ideal for small server rooms that are in close proximity to your IT staff, though wouldn’t be recommended for larger, mission-critical server rooms or data centers, given their inability to be monitored or managed remotely.

Metered rack PDU

Metered rPDUs provide the same reliable power distribution as basic rPDUs but provide users with local power consumption data via a local display. The local display provides key power utilization metrics (current, voltage, power factor, etc.) to give users insight into equipment power usage for future adds, moves, and changes.

Some metered rack PDUs are available with enhanced features such as a visible light communication (VLC) allowing users to scan the digital display using a mobile application to gather valuable data to help with capacity planning and electrical load balancing.

Just like with the basic rPDU, some manufactures offer upgradeable metered power distribution units to provide flexibility to add remote monitoring without removing power from the connected devices.

Metered rPDUs are recommended for use in highly secure data center environments that must keep their power infrastructure air-gapped from the local network or for facilities that foresee an eventual need for remote monitoring.

Monitored rack PDU

Monitored rPDUs provide all the same features and functionality of the basic and metered power distribution units with the extra bonus of remote monitoring over the network.

Users are able to remotely access real-time power consumption metrics – down to the outlet – via a secure web interface so data center staff can monitor critical power utilization metrics in real time, regardless of their location. This continuous flow of information is useful in several key ways:

  • Automatic alerts can be triggered the second a user-defined threshold is exceeded.
  • Power usage can be tracked with much greater precision, improving billing accuracy.
  • Load balancing is more precise, limiting the amount of stranded power without risking shorts.
  • Environmental monitoring can be added to monitor critical environmental conditions.

Another key feature to consider is IP aggregation. built-in software features that allow up to 50 rPDUs to be monitored from a single IP address with self-configuration of downstream devices significantly reducing deployment time.

Switched rack PDU

Switched rPDUs represent the modern zenith of data center power distribution. They provide all of the same features and functionality as the monitored rack PDUs, with one key exception: they can be remotely managed.

Authorized data center personnel can turn on, turn off, or reboot unresponsive equipment remotely through an intuitive web interface. They can also limit power usage at the outlet to avoid accidental overloads. This provides users with ultimate control over their data center power usage, efficiency, and availability.

Switched rPDUs are highly recommended for any IT deployment whether that be a large-scale data center or a small remote location. They are especially valuable for users needing a quick and easy way to remotely reboot critical equipment by significantly reducing or eliminating the cost of deploying technicians to simply power cycle unresponsive servers or network gear.

Universal PDU

The Universal PDU is a versatile rack power distribution unit featuring a universal input and detachable Facility Side Cable (sold separately). The Universal PDU supports common AC power configurations ranging from 16A-60A and 120V-415V. Available in basic to intelligent models featuring advanced remote power and environmental monitoring and optional outlet level switching. The universal design simplifies critical IT infrastructure deployments by allowing a single model to be installed globally.

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Power Solution

Power Solution Overview

Electric Power is the rate at which electrical energy is transferred by an electric circuit. The SI unit of power is the watt, one joule per second. Standard suffixes apply to watts as with other SI units: thousands, millions and billions of watts are called kilowatts, megawatts and gigawatts respectively.

A common misconception is that electric power is bought and sold, but actually electrical energy is bought and sold. For example, electricity is sold to consumers in kilowatt-hours (kilowatts multiplied by hours), because energy is power multiplied by time.

Electric power is usually produced by electric generators, but can also be supplied by sources such as electric batteries. It is usually supplied to businesses and homes (as domestic mains electricity) by the electric power industry through an electrical grid.

Stabilizer

A voltage stabilizer is an electrical device that delivers a constant voltage to a load at its output terminals, regardless of the changes in the input or incoming supply voltage. It protects equipment or machinery against over voltage, under voltage, and other voltage surges.

Transformer

A transformer is a passive component that transfers electrical energy from one electrical circuit to another circuit, or multiple circuits. A varying current in any coil of the transformer produces a varying magnetic flux in the transformer’s core, which induces a varying electromotive force (EMF) across any other coils wound around the same core. Electrical energy can be transferred between separate coils without a metallic (conductive) connection between the two circuits. Faraday’s law of induction, discovered in 1831, describes the induced voltage effect in any coil due to a changing magnetic flux encircled by the coil.

AHF(Active Harmonic Filter)

Active harmonic filters, also called harmonic correction units, are parallel devices that act like a noise cancellation system and inject equal and opposite frequencies to mitigate harmonics. The filters can also provide additional current to correct the power factor.

GMD(Ground Monitoring Device)

An Ground Monitoring Device monitors the ungrounded system between an active phase conductor and earth. It is intended to give an alert (light and sound) or disconnect the power supply when the resistance between the two conductors drops below a set value, usually 50 kΩ (sample of IEC standard for medical applications). The main advantage is that the ungrounded or floating system allows a continuous operation of important consumers such as medical, chemical, military, etc.

Spike buster

A surge protector (or spike suppressor, surge suppressor, surge diverter, surge protection device (SPD) or transient voltage surge suppressor (TVSS) is an appliance or device intended to protect electrical devices from voltage spikes in alternating current (AC) circuits. A voltage spike is a transient event, typically lasting 1 to 30 microseconds, that may reach over 1,000 volts. Lightning that hits a power line can give a spike of over 100,000 volts and can burn through wiring insulation and cause fires, but even modest spikes can destroy a wide variety of electronic devices, computers, battery chargers, modems and TVs etc, that happen to be plugged in at the time. Typically the surge device will trigger at a set voltage, around 3 to 4 times the mains voltage, and divert the current to earth. 

Electrical Panels

A distribution board (also known as panelboard, breaker panel, electric panel, DB board or DB box) is a component of an electricity supply system that divides an electrical power feed into subsidiary circuits while providing a protective fuse or circuit breaker for each circuit in a common enclosure. Normally, a main switch, and in recent boards, one or more residual-current devices (RCDs) or residual current breakers with overcurrent protection (RCBOs) are also incorporated.

 

Active Filters

An active filter is a type of analog circuit implementing an electronic filter using active components, typically an amplifier. Amplifiers included in a filter design can be used to improve the cost, performance and predictability of a filter.

An amplifier prevents the load impedance of the following stage from affecting the characteristics of the filter. An active filter can have complex poles and zeros without using a bulky or expensive inductor. The shape of the response, the Q (quality factor), and the tuned frequency can often be set with inexpensive variable resistors. In some active filter circuits, one parameter can be adjusted without affecting the others.

Surge Protection Devices (SPD’S)

A surge protector (or surge suppressor, surge diverter, surge protection device (SPD) or transient voltage surge suppressor (TVSS) is an appliance or device intended to protect electrical devices from voltage spikes in alternating current (AC) circuits. A voltage spike is a transient event, typically lasting 1 to 30 microseconds, that may reach over 1,000 volts. Lightning that hits a power line can give a spike of over 100,000 volts and can burn through wiring insulation and cause fires, but even modest spikes can destroy a wide variety of electronic devices, computers, battery chargers, modems and TVs etc, that happen to be plugged in at the time. Typically the surge device will trigger at a set voltage, around 3 to 4 times the mains voltage, and divert the current to earth.

Static Transformer Switches and Phase Sequence Correction Device

A substation is a part of an electrical generation, transmission, and distribution system. Substations transform voltage from high to low, or the reverse, or perform any of several other important functions. Between the generating station and consumer, electric power may flow through several substations at different voltage levels. A substation may include transformers to change voltage levels between high transmission voltages and lower distribution voltages, or at the interconnection of two different transmission voltages.

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